‘I May Be A White Boy, But I’m Not Stupid’: Biden Gets Awkward At Black History Month Event


Joe Biden had some truly confusing words to share at the White House’s Black History Month event. “I may be a white boy, but I’m not stupid,” he declared. While on one hand, Biden claims to have knowledge about the Divine Nine—a group of African-American sororities—on the other hand, his 2019 comment about poverty and education is questionable.

Is Joe Biden trying to say something with these two seemingly contradictory statements? Or is he pandering in order to get votes? Let’s take a closer look at what Biden said during the Black History Month event.

In his speech, Biden praised history and mentioned learning “the good, the bad, and the truth of who we are as a nation” before then referencing the Divine Nine. “I may be a white boy, but I’m not stupid,” he proclaimed before adding that he has learned “a long time ago” about this organization.

It’s unclear if he was attempting to gain favor from potential voters or just making an offhand joke about himself.

His 2019 comments about poverty and education were also concerning as his logic seems flawed: poor kids can do well in school if they are given access to resources such as advanced placement programs (which should already happen).

This doesn’t necessarily mean that poor kids will automatically outperform their wealthier peers; it just means that they have an equal chance for success given the same resources available to everyone else.

It’s clear that Joe Biden is trying hard to appeal to minority voters by making statements like these which seem more like pandering than meaningful conversation. Instead of focusing on how minorities can succeed, Biden just said some things and moved on.

At best, Joe Biden’s words come across as disingenuous; at worst they can be seen as offensive or tone-deaf depending on who you ask.

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Here is my take; lying Joe Biden was pandering, as always. I don’t think he’s having a senior moment or trying to make a profound statement—I think Joe is just doing what he does best, trying to appear relatable to the crowd in front of him. Unfortunately for him, it never worse and it always comes off as awkward and observed.